Reviews

 

WRONG TOWN (Roamer Book 1)

Wrong Town - Roamer Book 1“Matt Mayo is a relative newcomer to the western genre, and he’s kicking butt and taking names.

I loved ROAMER: WRONG TOWN, and can’t wait for the next one in the series. This is fiction writing at it’s best, and some of the best writing you’ll find in the western field. If you’re a fan of well-written westerns, you won’t regret adding this one to your collection, and you’ll have a damn good time doing it.”
—Peter Brandvold (aka Frank Leslie), Western author

“Matthew P. Mayo is quickly becoming a rising star in the world of Western fiction, and WRONG TOWN, featuring Roamer, is sure to add to Mayo’s well-deserved reputation. WRONG TOWN introduces a main character that is not your stereotypical gunslinger. Roamer is a break from tradition, all the while, honoring the traditional Western, a feat in itself. From the first person narrative, to the clean, crisp, prose, and Roamer himself, this book promises to upend the genre–in a good way. Genres live and die on the entrance of new voices, and if WRONG TOWN is any indication, the Western is alive and healthy. This novel has everything readers and fans have come to expect from Westerns, and more; heart-pounding action, gritty prose, and sentimental storytelling, all without being sappy, or offering up any episodes of navel-gazing. Mayo delivers on all accounts–and I for one, can’t wait to read the next installment in Roamer’s adventures.”
Larry D. Sweazy, award-winning author of the Josiah Wolfe, Texas Ranger series

“This has to be my top book for 2008. Even now, nearly a year gone, Roamer’s fight with the grizzly still lives in my mind….

Wrong Town left me stunned and has to be ranked in my own personal top 10 of Westerns that I have read…. The opening chapter has Roamer fighting for his life against a grizzly bear—the read has an authentic feel to it as though the writer had lived through such an ordeal…. This book reads like a movie and is gripping from start to finish.

If you want a book that tells a story, then it’s there for the taking. But read it slowly, for this is a book with hidden depths. Much as I enjoy a traditional western, Wrong Town is something else. It is one of those books that lingers in the mind, and should be ranked up there amongst the best.”
—Raymond Foster (aka Jack Giles), Western author

“I’ve just started reading Wrong Town, and am very, very impressed. This is definitely my kind of Western.”
—David Whitehead (aka Ben Bridges), Western author

“First person narrative is not common in Westerns, yet when handled well, it lends an added weight of authenticity and intimacy. Matthew Mayo succeeds on all levels.

Roamer is a strong creation, and we feel his hunger, his despair and his anger. All the characters—whether the robbers, the major villain or the townspeople themselves—are drawn without resort to stereotype. A strong, character-driven tale, well told.

I’d read three other [Westerns] right before [Mayo's] and none of them came close in their ability to capture a scene or a character; their stories were okay, but reader involvement was limited.”
—R. Nicholson-Morton (aka Ross Morton), Western author


HOW THE WEST WAS WEIRD, VOL. II

Weird West CoverReview of my story, “The Witch Hole”:
“Let me admit, this type of tale is not usually my favorite. I can’t really tell you why, except that I wasn’t the kid who was into the mystery comics and such when I was young. And this one reads as if it would fit perfectly in an old DC House of Mystery or an EC comic. That, however, is the reason that I liked it as much as I did–because as I read it, I could see the artwork, I could see the creepy green and black coloring. The set up, the premise, and the characters smack heavily and enjoyably of that 1950s and 60s weird tale comic story, even though it’s in prose. FOUR OUT OF FIVE TIPS OF THE HAT.”
—Tommy Hancock, All Pulp


MAINE ICONS

Maine Icons … paints a picture of Maine by the numbers, and it is a love letter to what makes Maine Maine, from black flies and Stephen King to whoopie pies and the Big Chicken Barn, a favorite destination for book lovers.”
—Jan Gardner, The Boston Globe

“Part travel guide, part food journal, part history: Like many Mainers, Maine Icons wears more than one hat. It’s the kind of book to keep in the summer camp for day-trip ideas, or to have on the lunch counter, where the old salts can argue whether Moody’s Diner really does have the best pies. It will be a welcome gift to the couple making their very first visit to the Pine Tree State, and, perhaps most importantly, the perfect bedside read for all those not lucky enough to live here year round.”
—Julia Spencer-Fleming, Down East Magazine

“So now comes a newly published book by husband-and-wife writer-and-photographer team Mayo/Smith-Mayo. With beautiful photography and crisp, engaging prose, Maine Icons is a wonderful book that captures the Maine spirit in a fun and entertaining way…. You’ll find our Potatoes packed in Maine Icons between Moxie and Whoopie Pies. Have yourself some fun and order a copy of Maine Icons….”
—Megan & Jim Gerritson, Wood Prairie Farm, Bridgewater, Maine

Maine Icons: 50 Symbols of the Pine Tree State“In their book, Maine Icons: 50 Classic Symbols of the Pine Tree State, [the Mayos] have compiled half a hundred items that make the country’s 23rd state tick. The Mayos, who have lived in Maine for two decades, indicated they had difficulty settling on 50 celebrated symbols. Wild blueberries, bean hole beans, potatoes and whoopie pies made the menu, but fiddleheads didn’t cut the mustard. Raye’s Mustard did. Lupines and balsam were counted among Maine’s marvels; but nor’easters, spring floods and the Desert of Maine were left out in the cold … for now. Perhaps the Mayos will pen and photograph a sequel, as they indicated that many other treasures … are also worth exploring.”
—Beth Staples, Village Soup

“To be considered a true Mainer, or so goes the consensus, not only must you be born in Maine, you must have roots in the state for at least three generations. Otherwise you will be branded “from away.” Undaunted, two fearless non-natives, Jennifer Smith-Mayo and Matthew P. Mayo, have put together descriptions of what they consider the 50 iconic symbols that best epitomize the state. They range from the expected (lighthouses, lobster, chowder) to the unexpected (Maine’s female senators) to the delightful (the comical little birds known as puffins). Some of the choices are just plain fun, such as the inclusion of Stephen King, the Portland-born best-selling author. The Wyeth family is included here too — Andrew Wyeth’s famous painting, “Christina’s World,” was set in Cushing, Maine — as well as famous historic figures (Civil War Gen. Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain). Of course, L.L. Bean is included; its Freeport flagship store remains open 24 hours a day.”
—5 stars, Resourceful Traveler, Chicago Tribune

“What makes Maine Maine? A Northport couple tries to capture its essence in words and stunning images in the new book, Maine Icons. If you had to pick 50 iconic images to represent what Maine is all about, what would you choose? Would you stick to the more obvious candidates, like lobsters and lighthouses? Or would you go with something a little more understated – say, the Wyeth family? The Mayos have lived in midcoast Maine for 20 years and are now settled in Northport. The couple has had plenty of time over the years to explore Maine and get to know it well enough to be able to write this book, the first they have worked on together.”
—Meredith Goad, The Portland Press Herald


STEAMPUNK’D:

Review of my story, “Scourge of the Spoils”:
Steampunk'd includes MPM's Western Steampunk short story, Scourge of the Spoils
“This is one of the best short stories I’ve read in a long time. The setting is given directly, letting you know what the world is like without being overstated. You’re left wanting to hear more, but are given everything you need for the story. Characters, in the story, feel real. They’re introduced as needed and, like the setting, you’re given enough of their background to see where their motivations lie, and left wanting to know more about them, too. By the end, you’re left amazed by the twist that you know you should have seen coming but, I’m sure, you didn’t. Bravo Matthew Mayo, I’ll definitely be checking out some of your other work.”—Keystone Gaming Society

“Honorable mention must go to Matthew P. Mayo’s “Scourge of the Spoils,” a story in the Western tradition of True Grit, with its hardscrabble desert setting, a heroine in over her head, an unscrupulous guide, and a Sheriff hiding a tender heart behind the barrel of a gun. The character that really jumped off the page for me, however, was Doctor Ocularius, a brilliant scientist and cad, who rules the desert through trickery and guile. With predictable endings the norm in steampunk literature, the twist finale of this tale was a nice change.”
—Sarah Panda, Amazon Reviewer

Scourge of the Spoils by Matthew P. Mayo: Steampunk set in a western setting again here, with mechanical horses, an underground mining machine, and a plot centered around that age-old sin, greed. Everyone in this story wants something, mostly money, but fame and revenge don’t hurt either. And it culminates in a stand-off, although not the kind you’d find in a standard western. A surprise ending as well.”
—Joshua Palmatier, Fantasy Author

“I read the Matthew Mayo story and loved it…. and I’m not even a fan of the steampunk genre! I would recommend it to fans of sci-fi in general. Very tight, well-written story!”
—Keystone Gaming Society


BOOTLEGGERS, LOBSTERMEN & LUMBERJACKS:
Fifty of the Grittiest Moments in the History of Hardscrabble New England

“The Wild American West be damned! Matthew P. Mayo’s Bootleggers, Lobstermen, and Lumberjacks is a fascinating – and often absolutely blood-curdling – narrative of New England’s darkest and grittiest historical incidents and characters. A consummate storyteller with a lively,  entertaining voice, Matt Mayo has brought to life New England’s most evil pirates, scalpers, witch-hunters, and ax-murderers, along with a few equally chilling accounts of accidents and natural catastrophes.

For good measure, there are even a couple of raids on New England by Nazi and Confederate soldiers. Bootleggers, Lobstermen, and Lumberjacks is American history at its most violent and authentic. Edgar Allan Poe would have loved every story in it.”
—Howard Frank Mosher, award-winning author of A Stranger in the Kingdom, Where the Rivers Flow North and Walking to Gatlinburg

“Witch hunt victim Giles Corey appears as one of the case histories in Bootleggers, Lobstermen & Lumberjacks (Globe Pequot Press, $16.95). Matthew P. Mayo, a prolific author of western fiction, pulls out all the stops of his pulp style to dramatize “Fifty of the Grittiest Moments in the History of Hardscrabble New England,’’ including Corey’s death by crushing after he refused to enter a plea in his witchcraft trial. Mayo covers other lurid moments, such as the Lizzie Borden case, and resurrects many low points of New England history, including shipwreck cannibalism, the exhumation of a tuberculosis victim suspected of being a vampire, and numerous accounts of rum runners. Mayo follows each fictional sketch with more clear-eyed history putting the event in context.”
—The Boston Globe

“I’m happy to call Matthew (and Jen) my friend, but I’m still objective about his talents, which are many. I know one of these days I’ll go into the bookstore and see a shelf full of Mayo, fiction and non-fiction. He’s a damn good writer. The Globe Pequot books are a fantastic read, fun and different than any “history” books that I have encountered.”
Larry D. Sweazy, award-winning author of the Josiah Wolfe, Texas Ranger series

“Matthew P. Mayo is a master of starting as irresistibly close to the action as possible. In his fiction and his non-fiction, he opens with just enough that you care about his characters and then he hits that character fast and hard. Mayo’s sentences are lean, tough and graceful. His writing has a powerful sense of moment and of scene, of gesture and of other human subtleties. Cowboys, Mountain Men, & Grizzly Bears and Bootleggers, Lobstermen & Lumberjacks tell fifty tales each of some of the most harrowing moments in their respective regions. These aren’t dry recountings or glossy propaganda.

Bootleggers, Lobstermen & Lumberjacks contains stories of swamp fights, death rides, and massacres, of pirates, rum-runners, and ordinary people doing extraordinary things in the face of extraordinary circumstances. Cowboys, Mountain Men, & Grizzly Bears features stories about gunfights, death marches, and grizzly wrestling, of narrow escapes, deadly winters, and cannibalism.

These are gritty stories – stories, as he says in the introduction of Bootleggers, of “showing courage, resolve, and pluck in one’s daily life, of being tough and uncompromising in the face of adversity.” Indeed, both of Mayo’s Grittiest Moments books read like Loren D. Estleman and Jim Thompson got together to re-write a Stephen Ambrose history book.”
—Jeremy L.C. Jones, Booklifenow.com

“Being a Midwesterner, I don’t know much about the East Coast, the way of the Lobstermen or Bootleggers, but I was thoroughly entertained by this collection of short history lessons. Each article is a brief window that opened to a new world for me, and piqued my curiosity to learn more, which is one of the points of any good non-fiction, history book. I was introduced to this “concept type of non-fiction book” with Mayo’s previous collection, COWBOYS, MOUNTAIN MEN, AND GRIZZLY BEARS, and instantly became a fan. Mayo is a heck of a good writer, and I have recommended this book to several of my friends. Pick it up, you won’t be disappointed.”
—Larry D. Sweazy, award-winning author of the Josiah Wolfe, Texas Ranger series

Bootleggers, Lobstermen & Lumberjacks: Fifty of the Grittiest Moments in the History of Hardscrabble New England, by Matthew P. Mayo. This is a fantastic collection of grit — these tales will make your teeth fall out so that you’ll grin like a real outlaw. It’s the kind of book you can dip into (and twice, if you like, there’s no dipping rule here) and plow your way through a story and then skip one (or more) and still feel like you’ve had a history lesson about hardscrabble New England. I devoured a couple stories last night (Boon Island cannibals, the landing of the Mayflower, the Great Swamp Fight, the Candlemas Massacre, man-eating sharks, the last vampire, the human shingle, and the one about Jigger the river hog and his spiked boots ). These tragic, violent, and sometimes comic tales are so thoroughly researched, it gave me a complex. It’s amazing how Mr. Mayo covers so much historical territory as well as coming up with some rip-roaring narratives.”
—Allister Timms, Author

“Life is hard in New England. That’s the message that comes through loud and clear in this new history book by Northport author Matthew P. Mayo. Nature is at the heart of many of the travails documented in the book and culled by Mayo from nearly 400 years of history. And yet, humanity has only itself to blame for a goodly number of the events. In the book, which starts with a deadly Atlantic crossing by the Pilgrims in 1620 and ends with Maine coast trap wars in 1949, Mayo does a sterling job of bringing history to life.

It isn’t enough for a writer of history to recite names, dates and places. Indeed it’s essential to re-create the three-dimensional people around which history is woven. And with the imagined dialogue at the heart of each vignette in his book, Mayo does exactly that. That isn’t to say that he skimps on the facts. At the end of each chapter, he writes in detail about each event, along with supplying information about similar occurrences. What should be a snack ends up being a meal for voracious readers. Bootleggers, Lobstermen & Lumberjacks is an intriguing way to capture readers who may be unfamiliar with the history that has happened in their own backyards.”

—Dale McGarrigle, Bangor Daily News


COWBOYS, MOUNTAIN MEN & GRIZZLY BEARS:
Fifty of the Grittiest Moments in the History of the Wild West

Cowboys, Mountain Men and Grizzly Bears Cover

“I loved Cowboys, Mountain Men, and Grizzly Bears. It’s absolutely terrific. What a saga of the Great American West.”
—Howard Frank Mosher, award-winning novelist

“Mayo’s gift for detail makes for riveting reading. If you’ve ever wondered what it would be like to have a grizzly bear slice the skin off your back like it was peeling an orange, or what it would feel like to be scalped but only after you’d been punctured with arrows AND shot, or to watch your husband and son be devoured by starving wolves, then you’ll have your answers in Cowboys. Needless to say, you won’t forget these stories anytime soon.”
—Laurie Powers, Laurie’s Wild West
(Click here for the full review.)

“Serving up fast, bite-sized anecdotes of pulse-pounding history, Mayo gives us the equivalent of salted peanuts (try and eat just one), but packed with ten times more nutrition. It’s the kind of book that will have you loitering around the display like a kid at the comic book spinner.”
—Richard Prosch, Meridian Bridge
(Click here for the full review.)

“… I can’t recommend it highly enough. The man knows the West, and, better still, knows how to tell a story.”
—Andrew Vietze, author of Becoming Teddy Roosevelt

“An excellent variety of great stories, told in superb narrative style.”
—John D. Nesbitt, Spur Award-winning Western writer and author of Trouble at the Redstone

“Mayo brings the West alive in this witty and entertaining volume of essays that span from Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump to Tom Horn. Cowboys, Mountain Men, and Grizzly Bears puts the reader right in the middle of the action, making history not only accessible, but fun, scary, and most importantly, real. Mayo is a writer to keep a lookout for.”
—Larry D. Sweazy, Spur Award-winner and author of The Rattlesnake Season

“Just glancing at its title, one would be forgiven for thinking that Matthew P. Mayo’s collection of brief historical anecdotes stays with the more mainstream-classroom elements of Western lore, but don’t be fooled. There are pistoleros galore. Army/Indian conflict is not suggested in the title, but COWBOYS, MOUNTAIN MEN & GRIZZLY BEARS: FIFTY OF THE GRITTIEST MOMENTS IN THE HISTORY OF THE WILD WEST contains stories about the usual collection of military mishaps and massacres.

Mayo is a breezy yarn-spinner, the kind you’d like to sit around a pot-bellied stove with on a cold night. With 50 tales in a little more than 200 pages, you know there’s no room for details, but the book includes a comprehensive bibliography so you can do a little digging on your own for more information.

This one is fun and the kind of book you’d see in the gift shop in places like Tombstone or Deadwood. If you can’t hit the trail, this is the next best thing.”
Doug Bentin, Bookgasm.com
(Click here for the full review.)

“Matthew P. Mayo has a keen eye for the absurd. His Westerns are steeped in authenticity and boiled in action, but it is Mayo’s skewed vision of the world that lingers long after the final page. He shows us the mythic West with the sharp, clear eye of a realist looking through rippled glass. Mayo is the author of the novels WINTERS’ WAR, WRONG TOWN, and HOT LEAD, COLD HEART, and the editor of WHERE LEGENDS RIDE: NEW TALES OF THE OLD WEST. At his finest, Mayo captures the surreal and very human quality of everyday life in the 19th century west. His protagonists meet whatever comes their way with nonchalance; they struggle in a world of misperceptions and uncertain realities, come what may. Time and again they must sort out the mythic from the mundane, the weak from the strong, the bizarre from the necessary. Yet, even deep within the most tangled cases of mistaken identity and the darkest of back alley nights, Mayo is always in control of his craft.

In HOT LEAD, COLD HEART, the protagonist Mason, a grizzled gunman who kills only those who deserve it, rides slowly through the woods to take care of one last problem before hanging up his gun. The problem? He must settle a score with a porcine megalomaniac whose sweaty grip on the town Cayuse Falls is slipping quickly away. On the way, Mason meets a big-hearted Irish drummer with logorrhea, a pair of mismatched sisters on a rampage, and a donkey and mule team that always shows up at just the right time. But the most compelling character is Rip, the town Marshall, who is caught between a manipulative benefactor and an ambitious wife. The overall effect of Hot Lead, Cold Heart is as much Louis L’Amour’s HONDO as it is Barry Hannah’s NEVER DIE or Percival Everett’s GOD’S COUNTRY.

Mayo writes evocative prose, gritty characters, and action-packed scenes. Themes, as he has mentioned in interviews, “of self-reliance, overcoming adversity, [and] the satisfaction felt when a tough job is well in hand” run smoothly beneath the characters and the action. If you enjoy authors like Jack London, Mickey Spillane, Jim Thompson, Loren D. Estleman, Robert J. Randisi, James Reasoner, Larry D. Sweazy, Peter Brandvold, and Johnny D. Boggs, then you will find a kindred spirit in Matthew P. Mayo–a kindred spirit who is nonetheless very much an original voice in the landscape of Western literature.”
—Jeremy L.C. Jones, Booklifenow.com

“I know Matthew’s work from his excellent novels for the Black Horse western range – Winters’ War (also available in a large print edition) is a superb western adventure that could serve as a textbook of how it’s done. Well his new book, Cowboys, Mountain Men and Grizzly Bears is a text book of sorts, that is its a non-fiction title containing fifty true stories from the distant days of the Old West.

There the text book analogy ends, though. The author has avoided setting out his tales as a list of facts and instead, partly dramatised events, so that they become all the more real. It brings everything to life and the reader is sucked into the thrilling stories, making history accessible and enjoyable.”
Gary Dobbs, The Tainted Archive
(Click here for the full review.)

“A collection of 50 gritty tales from the Wild West that will have you wishing you had a bullet to bite.”
—Allister Timms

“This is a great collection of short little pieces roughly lumped onto three different categories, as Mayo outlines in the introduction: Mountain Men and Indians; Man vs. Nature; and Cowboys and Gunfighters; running chronologically from the early 19th century to the early 20th century. It touches on many great stories — 50 of ‘em — all of which are potentially worthy of full books devoted to each one. It is an exciting, and harrowing, review of the hardships faced in the Old West, as well as many of the larger-than-life characters to come out of that era. A great book to keep on the bedside table for those moments when you only have 10 or 15 minutes to read at a time. Recommended!”
Chris La Tray, Goodreads

“A hefty title for a book that’s truly loaded for b’ar: but one word, Moments, in the subtitles, offers a clue to one of the book’s greatest strengths: the author’s gift for finding the precise little instants in the lives of his subjects upon which to shine his searchlight, to pick out his telling details…. Oh, the historical research is first rate, of course, but what makes this book so readable is that these are not only (very good) pieces of research, they’re stories.”
—Robert J. Pohle, Roundup Magazine

“Perhaps the manliest book ever written….”
—Teddy Roosevelt


WINTERS’ WAR

“Fantastic. The characters are so vivid, and I find their actions totally believable but at the same time, refreshing and spellbinding. I laughed out loud….”
—Laurie Lee Powers, author of Pulp Writer: Twenty Years in the American Grub Street
Winters War cover
Winter’s War … is a superb western adventure that could serve as a textbook of how it’s done.”
—Gary Dobbs, The Tainted Archive

“… Terrific. The characters (including the animals) really live on in my head, and [Mayo has] drawn the Western landscapes in the most vivid language. Great dialogue. The novel is beautifully written.”
—Professor L. Kaplan

“A great first-time novel…. Well drawn characters move through an icy snowstorm to one of the best finales that I have ever read. A tense Western written with a fine pace, descriptive and with a good sense of time … like watching a film—I could see it all and feel it. It’s one of those books that gets you so involved with the characters that you don’t want it to end—I’d love to find out what happened next. It’s just the right way to end a book.”
—Raymond Foster (aka Jack Giles), Western author

“… a wizard with words.”
—M. Siebert, reader from Surprise, AZ

“A taut, riveting first novel that just happens to be a Western. Everyone is drawn well—living breathing people with whom we can empathise. This is a very good first novel. Sheer enjoyment of a fast-paced, page-turning tale, well told. I’m looking forward to reading Matt’s second book.”
—R. Nicholson-Morton (aka Ross Morton), Western author

“It’s been a long time since I’ve read a Western that I couldn’t put down — come to think of it, I think the last time was when reading another Black Horse Western, Winter’s War by Matthew Mayo, and a few short stories like ‘A Man Called Horse.’ ”
—Laurie Lee Powers, author of Pulp Writer: Twenty Years in the American Grub Street


WRONG TOWN

“This has to be my top book for 2008. Even now, nearly a year gone, Roamer’s fight with the grizzly still lives in my mind….
Wrong Town cover
Wrong Town left me stunned and has to be ranked in my own personal top 10 of Westerns that I have read…. The opening chapter has Roamer fighting for his life against a grizzly bear—the read has an authentic feel to it as though the writer had lived through such an ordeal…. This book reads like a movie and is gripping from start to finish.

If you want a book that tells a story, then it’s there for the taking. But read it slowly, for this is a book with hidden depths. Much as I enjoy a traditional western, Wrong Town is something else. It is one of those books that lingers in the mind, and should be ranked up there amongst the best.”
—Raymond Foster (aka Jack Giles), Western author

“I’ve just started reading Wrong Town, and am very, very impressed. This is definitely my kind of Western.”
—David Whitehead (aka Ben Bridges), Western author

“First person narrative is not common in Westerns, yet when handled well, it lends an added weight of authenticity and intimacy. Matthew Mayo succeeds on all levels.

Roamer is a strong creation, and we feel his hunger, his despair and his anger. All the characters—whether the robbers, the major villain or the townspeople themselves—are drawn without resort to stereotype. A strong, character-driven tale, well told.

I’d read three other [Westerns] right before [Mayo's] and none of them came close in their ability to capture a scene or a character; their stories were okay, but reader involvement was limited.”
—R. Nicholson-Morton (aka Ross Morton), Western author


Hot Lead Cold Heart Hale Edition

HOT LEAD, COLD HEART

“The third Mayo western I’ve read and up to the usual standard of good writing with disparate characters meeting up and their lives entwining. The mystery that is Mason is explained in the denouement. Very satisfying read, with humour, action, violence, suspense and compassion.”
—Nik Morton


Fistful of Legends

A FISTFUL OF LEGENDS:
21 All-New Blazing Tales of the Old West

“Matthew Mayo … offers up ‘Half a Pig,’ a meaty, cautionary tale written with a decent helping of heart—a story that is a Spur Finalist.”
—Larry D. Sweazy, Roundup Magazine


WHERE LEGENDS RIDE: New Tales of the Old West

“Fourteen horse-operas presented for your enjoyment by skilled writers who clearly know their stuff. “Once Upon A Time In Mirage”, by I.J. Parnham, and “Snows of Montana” by the editor, Matthew P. Mayo, read like saddle-tramp sagas inspired by O’Henry, their twisty ends fun. There is so little good short fiction done these days, when an excellent book like this comes along, you dare not pass it up. So tighten your cinches, belt on your holster and get ready to ride. This is one hell of a literary round-up.”
Pulp Fiction Reviews blog

Where Legends Ride cover“Editor Mayo’s “Snows of Montana” reveals a devastating predicament for the narrator which lingers long after you put the book down.”
Coastal Press, Spain

“Here in this book we have authors who love that old genre. They have written some very readable short stories, which I highly recommend. Some of the authors are old foxes, some are new. Most of them are in fact new to me, but they can really write an interesting and an amusing Western short story.”
The Swingbed Magazine, Sweden

Where Legends Ride, an anthology to suit all tastes, encompasses the best of the Western genre, but goes much further. This is an anthology of how the human spirit, even in the most difficult circumstances, can survive and conquer. As in the West itself, though, these are not just tales of grim survival. Some have humour, some are just downright clever. If you like a good read that grips you from start to finish, this anthology is for you.”
—Andrea Hughes, Western author

“A superb collection of Western short stories by a number of new and established Black Horse Western writers. An excellent jumping-on point for new Western readers and great entertainment for longtime western fans.”
—Howard Hopkins (aka Lance Howard), Western author

“Highly recommended. You don’t have to be a Western fan to enjoy it.”
—Raymond Foster (aka Jack Giles), Western author


“Kin” from OUT OF THE GUTTER #5

Out of the Gutter Magazine cover

“From Matthew P. Mayo comes “Kin,” where a guy attempting to retrieve a football under his porch is instead greeted by the fangs of a poisonous snake. His attempts to drive to the hospital for help as the toxins swim through his bloodstream achieve rollicking, bizarrely comic heights.”
Rod Lott, Bookgasm (www.bookgasm.com)